27 3 / 2014

morivan:

seerofsarcasm:

dopplegangerdream:

hpldreads:

If you loved:

Maybe you should try one of these!

SO MUCH LOVE FOR THIS POST

I’ve read a majority of these, I highly recommend Matched, The Uglies Series, Heir Apparent and all the classics (but especially Brave New World).

The Host is actually really good but INCREDIBLY slow to start, and it’s not awful in terms of characters like Twilight.

These might be more specifically cyberpunk than dystopian, but, You might also consider the Burning Chrome anthology from William Gibson, or a fair bit of the work of Philip K. Dick, particularly Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and A Scanner Darkly. The Man in the High Castle might be closer to Dystopian.

(via 0bsidianorder)

20 1 / 2014

unimpressedcats:

King of the jungle

07 12 / 2013

justseventeen:

December 1987. “A small furry creature you can cuddle up next to, as warm as a litter of pretty, pale sweaters…”

justseventeen:

December 1987. “A small furry creature you can cuddle up next to, as warm as a litter of pretty, pale sweaters…”

(via dancersaurus)

12 8 / 2013

(Source: dancersaurus)

10 8 / 2013

09 8 / 2013

"

As a university tutor in my hometown, a city which is roughly 40% black and 37% white, I still had students asking me, “Do they just never learn how to talk right?” I pull up a chair when this happens, “Listen up, gang.” So what do I tell them? Well, the goal is to convey that, scientifically speaking, non-standard varieties of English such as the English spoken by Rachel Jeantel and the ‘proper English’ they’ve been taught are equally communicative. I go over the differences and point out that both have a rule system that must be followed to speak convincingly.

But then, I don’t see why there should need to be that justification. So I end up trying to teach respect. If they have a student that speaks a non-standard variety of English, they need to understand that that student is therefore competent in understanding at least two versions of English: the version they speak at home and other safe environments, and the one forced upon them when listening to you. Respect that.

The alarmingly pervasive idea that standard English equates to ‘good grammar’ and non-standard English equates to ‘bad grammar’ is false and exclusionary. When it’s used in conjunction with intelligence and credibility of a young black woman, it’s reminiscent of the faulty scientific racism of “The Bell Curve.” But language shaming is currently acceptable behavior in the status quo. It is one of the last bastions of unabashed racism and classism.

"

09 7 / 2013

20 5 / 2013

dancersaurus:

i recently just realized in the past few months, i prefer not to be called transgendered anymore,

yes, i was born as a female, and i have always felt more masculine than feminine, and i identify as male. but overall,

i am ME-gendered.

in other words i embrace masculinity when i feel masculine,…

16 5 / 2013

do you ever cry because you’ve somehow managed to gain a truly fucking amazing person as your friend? and just think about how fucking blessed you are for their existence and how in some previous life you must have done something fucking amazing to deserve them in this life? DO YOU?

(via maryjanewtson)

09 5 / 2013

dancersaurus:

If you are bilingual/multilingual and you would be willing to fill out a short questionnaire for me, please answer here. It will be very short, anonymous and I will be using it for my final paper in my Cultural Anthropology class. I would really appreciate it, and it would really help me out! Thanks everyone. 

Anyone interested?

Please help my friend with this project! We should always help out our fellow researchers!